Spray Painted Flower Pots

Since baby girl was born in May, nothing has been created. And I have been in desperate need to make, decorate or complete something, anything, for my own sanity.

Since we moved in, I’ve wanted large, blue flower pots in front of our house.

Have you ever purchased large planters for your home? Talk about sticker shock! When I find one with a price I can stomach, they aren’t the color I want. And when I find pots I love, well, they are so expensive I just can’t handle it.

Last spring I told myself I would wait and find some on clearance.

Of course I then forgot to look. So this year, spring rolled around and still, no planters.

Then wandering around Target with a sleeping baby I saw these flower pots on clearance for $15 each. I like the shape and metal handles.

A Fun Weekend Project - Spray Painted Flower Pots | thisgratefulmama.com

As usual, the price was right, but not the color.

Still wandering through aisles, I stumbled upon matte Valspar Devine Color spray paint in pale blue. With paint and primer in one can, and good for interior and exterior projects, it was worth a try!

A Fun Weekend Project - Spray Painted Flower Pots | thisgratefulmama.com

I returned home excited to paint. But the problem with spray paint is you need a day that is not too hot, not too humid, and not too windy.

A tall order in MN.

So the pots sat in my garage.

Waiting.

Finally, two weeks ago it was 75 degrees with little wind over the weekend.

One nap time and two cans of spray paint completed the project.  This paint coats pretty well, but definitely needs multiple coats. The handles were protected with painters tape while painting.

A Fun Weekend Project - Spray Painted Flower Pots

These planters are pretty light weight. Instead of filling them with dirt (which is hard to get rid of in the fall, and makes the pots unbearably heavy for me to move), we decided on a different plan. We bought cinder blocks for $1.05 a piece.

They didn’t fit as perfectly as I’d imagined, because I didn’t take into account basic geometry when I measured the pot…turns out 8 inch diameter means the DIAGONAL of the cinder block needs to be 8 inches, not the edges. Whoops. Not my brightest moment.

Thankfully my resourceful husband rescued me with a helpful and can-do attitude (and no complaining!). He used a hammer to break the cinder blocks up so they fit into the bottom of the pots.

A Fun Weekend Project - Spray Painted Flower Pots

The cinder blocks provide weight so the pots won’t blow over. They’ve survived some pretty severe weather in the past two weeks and I’m confident they’ll stay put in the wind. The blocks add just enough height so our already planted flowers in their pots could be placed on top of them.

A Fun Weekend Project - Spray Painted Flower Pots

Voila.

I’ll follow up in September to let you know how the spray paint held up outside for the season.

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Update Furniture You Already Own: DIY Spray Painted Bar Stools

Our kitchen is full of neutrals and needed a pop of color to coordinate with our dining room.

As I’ve mentioned before, our budget is limited so wherever possible, we use what we already have, updating where necessary. We already own four wood bar stools at the perfect height for our kitchen island. However, they too were neutral in color and don’t go well with the decor of this house. Updating with paint is an inexpensive way to make them look new.

After an adventure stripping the finish from the bar stools (read here), they were ready to paint.

While I love the flat finish of chalk paint, especially when distressed, I didn’t feel like investing the time to clear coat or wax and buff these.

Four Reasons to Choose Spray Paint for Bar Stools:

  • its great for an inexpensive, factory-like, smooth finish, with very little effort
  • the gloss finish can be cleaned with a damp rag and doesn’t necessarily require a clear coat
  • without a clear coat, the stools can be easily painted to change the color down the road
  • if the paint begins to wear, it is easy to touch them up with leftover paint

We chose RustOleum Painter’s Touch 2x Ultra Cover Spray Paint, in Gloss Seaside. Who can argue with the ease of paint and primer in one can? The coverage was fantastic (in fact, WAY better than the Satin Granite (gray) paint used on our console table this summer. What they say is true; different colors can cover VERY differently).

Each bar stool required 2-3 coats, using a total of 4 cans of spray paint. There was quite a bit left in the fourth can to use for touch ups.

Used this paint

Used this paint

I won’t rehash the steps on how to spray paint furniture, but you can read this post if you’d like more detail. Here are the specifics that apply to painting these wood bar stools:

I spray paint in my garage with two large tarps to protect the floor and bottom edges of the walls. I open the garage door and always use a mask.

As with the console table, it was easiest to spray paint the legs first, with the stool upside down on the tarp.

Even though the stools will have felt pads on the bottom, I chose to cover the feet of the stools with painters tape. That way I could spray anywhere and not get paint on the feet that could someday scratch off on my wood floor.

All areas that were easy to spray at a downward angle were painted. While it was tempting to spray UPWARD to paint all the way around the spindles, I didn’t want to risk a dusting of spray paint on the garage ceilings and walls. Trust me, it travels further than you think! Plus, the un-coated areas of the stool are easily accessible from a downward angle when the stool is turned upright to paint the seat.

I allowed the paint to dry overnight before turning upright to prevent fingerprints in tacky paint. The seat was cleaned after turning upright, just in case.

Half way through the first coat. Great coverage with the paint.

Half way through the first coat. Great coverage with the paint.

Turned the stool upright and cleaned the top surface before painting

Turned the stool upright and cleaned the seat before painting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Again, surfaces were coated spraying at a downward angle, which effectively covered all areas missed before.

On the seat, two coats were sprayed and allowed to dry overnight. Then the seat was sanded with FINE sandpaper to remove any imperfections and ensure a smooth top. The final coat was sprayed and allowed to dry overnight.

Before using the stools, I checked that the paint no longer felt sticky or tacky. The paint should feel smooth and dry; if it doesn’t, wait longer or risk having impressions of someone’s rear-end on your seat that you’ll have to sand off and repaint.

Finished stool

Finished stool

When all four stools were finished, we put felt pads on each of the feet and moved them to our kitchen. We love the color they add to an otherwise neutral room and after 2 months of use, they’re holding up nicely.

Finished Stools add a pop of color to our kitchen

Finished Stools add a pop of color to our kitchen

Spending under $15 to update what we already have sure beats paying for new stools.

What do you already own that needs an inexpensive update?

DIY Decor: How to Update a Framed Mirror with Chalk Paint

How to Update a Framed Mirror with Chalk Paint

Chalk paint.

It’s all the rage on Pinterest. Several friends of mine have used it and love it (and what they painted looks fantastic!).

I’ve been dying to try it out but have been too afraid to jump in and use it on a large piece of furniture. Up until now, I’ve been chemically stripping or sanding my wood pieces to prep for spray paint.

With all the work that has been done to prep my other projects so far, the idea of no-prep before painting is rather alluring. I also love the flat finish of wax over chalk paint, especially when mildly distressed.

It. Was. Time.

Since we moved in December, we haven’t hung much on our walls. We have been slowly painting and decorating one room at a time. Currently, we are putting up a kitchen backsplash and painting the walls in our kitchen and main living area. I’ve also been refinishing some bar stools for our kitchen island (stripping them and spray painting them).

The rest of the space is coming together, but I have not selected anything to hang on the walls. With a tight budget, I’m hoping to use things we already have.

We have a framed mirror, in great condition from our old house. In the dimly lit basement, I thought it might look nice upstairs. However, after bringing it up, I didn’t like the color of the wood stain with the color of our floors and carpet.

Older mirror in good condition but the color doesn't go well with our new house

Older mirror in good condition but the color doesn’t go well with our new house

I still wanted to use the mirror but was afraid to chemically strip it, and sanding really isn’t that fun. Plus, if I keep sanding projects every night I’m going to have one skinny arm and one with Popeye muscles since I do most of the sanding with my right hand. There IS some sanding on the back-end if distressing the project, but MUCH less than removing the original finish.

So…finally, an experiment with chalk paint seemed like a great idea.

Unsure of how this would go and on such a small project, I didn’t want to splurge and buy Annie Sloan chalk paint. I looked online and checked out the colors at Home Depot and JoAnn Fabrics. I ended up buying Folk Art Chalk paint at JoAnn Fabrics for $7.99 (and actually paid about $4 with a 40% off coupon). I went back to buy the Folk Art clear wax to seal it the following week with a different coupon, and paid the same as the paint. For a little over $8, the refinishing is certainly worth it and much less expensive than buying a new mirror.

As you may have seen in a few other DIY posts and the post about our dining room, we’re using aqua, yellow, white and silver in our dining room. The dining room connects to our kitchen and main living area. We are using grey paint in those rooms and will use similar accent colors. I want something with a pop of color for the walls, so am using yellow on the mirror frame.

How to Update a Framed Mirror with Chalk Paint

Materials

  • Chalk Paint (I used Folk Art Home Decor Chalk Paint in Yellow Crochet)
  • Wax (I used Folk Art Home Decor Clear Wax)
  • Paint brushes (foam brush for paint and old beat up bristle brush for wax)
  • 100 grit sand paper
  • FINE sand paper block

Steps

1. Prepare to Paint

Use painters tape to protect surfaces that will not be painted

Use painters tape to protect surfaces that will not be painted

Clean the surface to be painted: Remove dust or debris, and then wipe with rubbing alcohol

Allow the surface to dry

Apply painters tape to any surface that will not be painted

 

2. Apply Chalk Paint in Thin Layers

Chalk Paint

Chalk Paint

Shake the paint well before use to ensure even coats

This paint has hardly any scent, so can be used indoors. As with most paint, it is a good idea for the object being painted and paint to be the same temperature when you start and to paint when it isn’t really hot or really cold

Use a paint brush to apply paint to the surface

Use care not to apply excess paint in the crevices to make it easier to sand later

A foam paint brush worked very well but bristle brush would also work 

Use care not to apply excess paint in the crevices

Use care not to apply excess paint in the crevices

This paint required 2 hours between coats

3 coats of paint were applied until desired coverage was achieved

First coat of chalk paint

First coat of chalk paint

 

 

Second Coat

Second Coat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third and Final Coat

Third and Final Coat

3. Allow to Fully Dry

The paint needs to dry fully before any sanding can be done

The three coats were applied 2 hours apart, and allowed to dry overnight

4. Sand to Smooth and/or Distress

Fine sanding block and 100 grit sand paper

Fine sanding block and 100 grit sand paper

To Smooth:

If you don’t want visible brush strokes sand the entire surface with a fine sanding block or sand paper

The fine grit will leave a silky smooth finish and help you get a feel for how much pressure to apply before the original surface shows through.

Use sand paper or sanding block to remove paint in some areas

Use sand paper or sanding block in the direction of the wood grain to remove paint in some areas

If you remove too much paint and didn’t want a distressed look, you can always, stop and reapply paint. Dry fully before sanding again.

To Distress:

Distress various areas using sand paper or a sanding block, focusing on areas that would naturally undergo ‘wear and tear’ (edges, corners, ridges)

As a general rule, higher grit will remove more paint with less pressure and effort, 

Use sand paper to remove paint in areas that would undergo wear and tear

Use sand paper to remove paint in areas that would undergo wear and tear

but will also remove the original surface if you aren’t careful.

If you want to see LAYERS (of different colored paint or paint and original finish), it may be worth using more effort with a FINE sand paper instead

Always sand and in the direction of the wood grain to avoid damaging the piece, and to avoid leaving visible scratches on the painted surface

Sand to distress the paint

Sand to distress the paint

It is important to randomize the areas to distress so it looks natural, not planned at the end.

Vary size of distressed area, location, and try to stagger around each edge.

I randomly turned the mirror around and picked different sections to distress on each edge. I tried to vary the length and width of each section

5. Seal with Wax

Clear wax

Clear wax

Wipe down the entire surface to wax with a dry rag and remove as much chalk dust as possible so loose paint doesn’t clump when wax is applied

The wax did have an odor so may be best applied outside or in a well-ventilated area

Use an old, clean paint brush to apply wax in a THIN coat and remove excess with a soft, clean rag

As with painting, use care not to apply excess wax in crevices

Once the wax has dried for an hour, buff the wax with a clear rag to create a little shine (otherwise leave for a matte finish)

Apply wax thinly and then wipe off excess with paper towel or cloth rag

Apply wax in a thin layer and wipe off excess with paper towel or a soft cloth rag

As wax is applied, the colors are deepened, and the contrast between the two colors became stronger

Wax did dry quickly but be sure it is fully dry before handling to avoid finger print impressions

 

 

 

Work in small sections since you can visually tell where wax has been applied

Work in small sections since you can visually tell where wax has been applied

 

 

 

 

 

The wax deepens the contrast between the colors

The wax deepens the contrast between the colors

 

 

 

 

Be sure to wax the outside edges. Might as well pick a beautiful day!

Be sure to wax the outside edges

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Enjoy the Finished Product

Chalk Painted Mirror

Chalk Painted Mirror

Chalk Painted Mirror Before and After

Chalk Painted Mirror, Before and After images

DIY Metallic Painted Coffee Beans

I recently stumbled across this picture of coffee beans that appeared to be painted.  I searched further, hoping for DIY instructions or at least where to buy some but was disappointed – it was just a photo with filters applied so the beans appeared blue.

Inspired by the photo, I was determined to recreate the look with paint and coffee beans. Initially, I thought spray paint would be best, but could not find metallic spray paint in the color I wanted. Instead I bought some metallic craft paint and decided to experiment.

DIY Metallic Coffee Beans are inexpensive, can be used to make a variety of accents, centerpieces, gifts and more. Even though I love the way they look, the best quality is they smell like coffee! Comforting, warm and homey.

Here are 4 good reasons to make your own: 4 Ways to Use DIY Metallic Painted Coffee Beans.

Happy Painting!

DIY Metallic Painted Coffee Beans

Materials:

  • 10 oz Whole Bean Coffee – $3 (bought with a coupon, cheapest brand)
  • Metallic Craft Paint in color of choice (I used Folk Art Metallic Acrylic Paint in Aquamarine and Ice Blue) – $1.99 each
  • Foam tipped paint brush – $1
  • Plastic bowl, or disposable aluminum foil tray
  • Paper cup
  • Baking sheet lined with aluminum foil

Steps Used:

Preparation

Start with 10 oz whole coffee beans

Start with 10 oz whole coffee beans

Metallic Craft Paint

Metallic Craft Paint

Pour coffee beans into a large bowl or tray

Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil

Transfer paint to a paper cup

IF mixing paint colors together, stir to mix using a foam paint brush

I couldn’t find the color I thought I wanted, so I mixed 2 parts Iced Blue craft paint in 1 part Aquamarine craft paint. In the end, the mixed color was washed out so I ended up adding Aquamarine paint, without mixing to brighten the beans up.

Paint the Beans

Coat the foam brush with paint

Coat the foam brush with paint

Stir the beans with the brush

Stir the beans with the brush coated in paint

Add more paint and continue to coat the beans by stirring

Re-coat the brush, and continue to stir the beans

Stop when coated as desired

Stop painting when coffee beans are the desired color

Coat the bottom half of the foam brush with paint so it is coated, but not dripping

Transfer the brush to the bowl of beans and use the brush to ‘stir’ the beans

(The more you stir, the thinner the coating on the beans)

When it appears no more paint is being transferred, re-coat the brush, and stir again.

Repeat steps until the beans are coated with paint as desired

I coated with the mixed color paint first, but it wasn’t bright enough. I then switched to the aquamarine paint and re-coated the brush more often, stirring less for a thicker coating

Allow to Dry Fully

Transfer to a foil coated baking sheet

Transfer to a foil coated baking sheet

When the beans have the desired amount of color, transfer to the baking sheet and allow to fully dry

(Mix them up every now and again to expose them to air and speed-up the drying process)

Mine seemed to be dry quickly, but I allowed them to sit overnight on the tray just to be sure

Use them

Once they are dry, they are ready to use! Feel free to share how you use yours in the comments.

Enjoy!

This post was shared on the Something To Talk About and Do Tell Tuesday Linkup Parties:

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4 Ways to Use DIY Metallic Painted Coffee Beans

Last week I made some Metallic Painted Coffee Beans; easy to make, inexpensive, and smell lovely.

I was inspired when I stumbled across this picture of coffee beans that appeared to be painted. I clicked on the photo in hope of some DIY instructions, but instead found the beans only appeared blue due to some fancy photo editing. I was disappointed, since I had already thought of a bunch of ways I could use them in my home.

I decided to try a little experiment to make my own.

I will soon post a little tutorial on how to make your own metallic painted coffee beans, but first I thought I’d give you a few reasons to want them!

4 Ways to Use DIY Metallic Painted Coffee Beans

 

1. Vase Filler

Use metallic painted coffee beans as vase filler in a clear glass container.

These two examples show the painted beans in a mason jar with some other DIY accents (Crackle Painted Glass Bottle, Spray Painted Wine Bottle and Votive), and as a stand-alone accent in a round glass vase.

Use beans to fill a Mason Jar and group with other glass accents

Use metallic painted coffee beans to fill a Mason Jar. Group with other DIY accent pieces

Use as vase filler

Use metallic painted coffee beans as vase filler

 

2. Create a Centerpiece

Use the painted coffee beans to create a centerpiece and display on your dining table or kitchen island. Three examples are shown below.

  • Place a large candle in a small metal bucket or other container and surround with metallic coffee beans
  • Spread metallic coffee beans on a platter and place a handful of votive candles throughout
  • Fill different glass containers with metallic coffee beans and place in a line on a dining table (Depending on the occasion, you could create different colored sets of beans – red, white and blue for 4th of July OR green, red and silver or gold for Christmas).
Bucket with candle

Place a large candle in a metal bucket and surround with metallic painted coffee beans. Use as a centerpiece or accent.

Spread metallic painted coffee beans on a platter and place votive candles throughout to create an easy centerpiece for a dining table or center island

Spread metallic painted coffee beans on a platter and place votive candles throughout to create an easy centerpiece for a dining table or center island

Fill various sized glass containers with metallic coffee beans and create a long, skinny centerpiece

Fill various sized glass containers with metallic coffee beans and create a long, skinny centerpiece

 

3. Give a Gift

Wrap metallic coffee beans in a clear cellophane bag, tie with a ribbon, and bring as an inexpensive, homemade housewarming or hostess gift. Maybe I’ll make these to give hosts this year during Christmas…

Wrap metallic coffee beans in cellophane and give as a gift

Wrap metallic coffee beans in cellophane and give as a gift

 

4. Dress-Up a Fake Plant

I have some fake plants in my house. That fake ‘grass’ or dirt in them is never convincing and gets dusty and weird. One way to change that is to just cover it up with something decorative like these metallic painted coffee beans.  Would be cool in an even larger pot!

Dress up a fake plant with metallic coffee beans in the pot

Dress up a fake plant with metallic coffee beans in the pot

 

Other ideas

There are many amazing decorative ideas for plain coffee beans on the internet. Here are a few of my favorites. Any of these could use either plain coffee beans, metallic painted coffee beans, or a mixture of the two.

 

What would you do with them?

Feel free to post to your favorite link of how to use them, or a quick comment.

 

Decorate your Dining Room for Less

Decorate your dining room for less

We moved into a newly built house last December. All walls were white and there were no window treatments. Endless possibility, with potential for big expense. The first room we decided to decorate is the dining room. Its long and skinny, with windows on 3 sides. It is my favorite room in this house.

My normal tendency is to go conservative and use neutral colors, but it ends up looking bland. This is our first home with white trim, which made us feel a little more freedom to use COLOR. Our decorating budget is pretty low, so it was our goal to spend as little as possible, but have it look the way we want it to look.

Window Treatments

curtains

Max Studio Home Curtains found at Home Goods

Initially, I planned to stencil plain white curtains using fabric paint and a wall stencil. By my estimate, this would have cost $100 for 2 pairs of curtain panels (AND a lot of sweat equity AND potential to mess it up).

When wandering through Home Goods, I found 2 pairs of Max Studio Home white and silver curtains for $80. I had a $75 gift card for Home Goods (best gift ever), so I only paid $5 out of pocket.

We hung the curtains using Threshold Square Drapery Rods in Oil Rubbed Bronze from Target ($60 for two, and TODAY you get a $15 gift card when purchased online, along with free shipping if you use your Red Card!).

We chose to leave the three windows on the back wall uncovered since we love the view. If we decide to cover them for privacy later, we’ll use the same curtain rod, and sheer white curtains from IKEA (estimated cost for rod and 2 pairs of curtains, $50).

Area Rug

Dining Room Rug - Threshold Patio 7x11 Rug

Threshold Outdoor Patio Rug

First of all, let me say the cost of area rugs is ABSURD! We needed a 7’x10′ (or larger) rug because our chairs were scratching the floor, despite the felt pads on the legs. With new home construction outside, there is dirt and dust everywhere!

After shopping around, the lowest price of a rug I somewhat liked was $300+. I literally jumped for joy in the store when I found this 7×11 Threshold outdoor patio rug at Target (This one is no longer being sold but check out this similar option released spring of 2016). We paid $120. The material is fade resistant, and so far, stain resistant (as tested by my 1 and 3 year old kids – every spilled food has washed off with a rag and a little water even after a full year!). I love the pattern and color, and am very pleased with how it is holding up.

Accents

accents 2

Painted Wine Bottles and Mason Jar

accents 1

Painted Vase, Votive, Bottle and ‘Runner’

You may have seen previous posts about painting jars and bottles for accent pieces in this room (See: DIY Spray Painted Wine Bottle and Candle Holder, DIY Glass Enamel Mason Jar and Vase, and DIY Crackle Painted Glass Bottle).

Because I already owned the glass containers, tape and spay paint, I just had to purchase craft paints (3 for $1.99 a piece).

I wanted to make a table runner, but don’t have a sewing machine. I also don’t like how fabric runners tend to wrinkle (I know I won’t iron it!). I bought a 1/4″ thick board ($5 at Hobby Lobby) and used painters tape and leftover craft paint to paint stripes. I now have a wrinkle free ‘runner’, that matches the accents.

IKEA artificial plants and pots

IKEA Fake Grass and Pot

greenery1

IKEA Fake Plant and Pot

For the ledge between the kitchen and dining room, we purchased these flower pots ($1.99 a piece) and fake greenery ($3.99 a piece) from IKEA. We had this IKEA candle holder ($7.99 new) already, and added it to the ledge.

Walls

Finished, painted room

Glidden High Endurance Plus Paint in Alluring Aruba Blue

We purchased one gallon of Glidden High Endurance Plus paint (Walmart, $17) in Alluring Aruba Blue ($17). We used one new paint brush ($7), one roller ($1.99), and one roll of blue painters tape ($5).

The first streak of paint was a little unnerving because it is a bold color, but we love how this room turned out!

art 2

Art by Pam Faessler

art 1

Art by Pam Faessler

The framed pictures are watercolor paintings printed on canvas. My mom, Pam Faessler, created these and I love having her artwork on display in our home. AND they look great with the paint color!

Finished Room

Here is the BEFORE picture and a few more pictures of the finished room. After everything, we spent $324 (which included a $75 gift card, so really $249!), which is about what the area rug would have cost if we hadn’t found this patio rug!

If you want the rug, hurry up and buy it while they still have it, at an even better price!

Room BEFORE

Room BEFORE

Finished Room, view of sliding door

Finished Room, view of sliding door

Finished, painted room

Finished room

Finished room, view of side windows

Finished room, view of side windows

Future Projects

In the future, the bench by the window will either be sanded and painted yellow, OR will get a yellow and white patterned cushion (made with outdoor fabric). For now, I can’t decide, so when this gets done, I’ll do an update post. And SOMEDAY (not soon), we plan to get a very long extension table (up to 130″) and new chairs, probably in Espresso finish.

A girl can dream…

DIY Accents: Spray Painted Wine Bottle and Votive Candle Holder

 

 

This is the last of a series of posts about painting glass containers to use as accent pieces in my dining room (see DIY Crackle Painted Wine Bottle and DIY Enamel Mason Jar and Vase). My dining room has aqua walls, and white and silver curtains. After making the yellow and white accent pieces, I decided to use some leftover spray paint to make some silver pieces. In our old house, we spray painted old cabinet hinges for a low cost makeover. I had some Satin Nickel spray paint leftover and used it to paint the outside of a wine bottle and the inside of a votive candle holder. If I did it all again, I’d paint the outside of the votive instead of the inside so it could be used to burn candles.

DIY Spray Painted Wine Bottle

Finished spray painted bottle

DIY Spray Painted Bottle and Votive Candle Holder

DIY Spray Painted Wine Bottle and Votive Candle Holder

Supplies:

  • Wine Bottle with labels removed
  • Votive candle holder
  • Rubbing Alcohol (99% Isopropyl Alcohol) $2.16
  • Blue Painters Tape
  • Rust Oleum Universal All-Surface Metallic Spray Paint (Satin Nickel) $10

Steps Used:

 

Clean the wine bottle and votive candle holder and allow to dry FULLY

Clean the wine bottle and votive candle holder and allow to dry FULLY

 1. Prepare the Bottle and Votive:

Wash with soapy water, rinse and allow to dry

Use a paper towel and rubbing alcohol to remove any remaining debris or residue on the exterior

Add rubbing alcohol to the votive and swirl to rinse

Allow to dry FULLY

 

 

 

 

Use painters tape to cover the exterior, leaving the rim exposed

Use painters tape to cover the exterior, leaving the rim exposed

 2. Cover Areas that won’t be Painted with Tape

Use Painters Tape to cover the exterior of the votive candle holder, leaving the rim uncovered

*Note: to paint the EXTERIOR of the votive instead of the interior, coat the inside with painters tape, leaving the rim exposed. This was easier when I used smaller pieces of tape

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shake the spray paint and apply a thin, even coat of paint to the exterior of the wine bottle and interior of the votive

Shake the spray paint and apply a thin, even coat of paint to the exterior of the wine bottle and interior of the votive

2. Apply Paint in Thin Coats

Place the bottle and votive on a protective surface in a well ventilated area (I used a large piece of paper, outside)

Shake the spray paint to mix thoroughly before use

From a distance of about 10 inches, spray an even, THIN coat of paint on all surfaces to be painted (if too thick, paint will start to drip)

Wait one hour before applying a second coat (wait at least 30 minutes before handling)

If using 3 coats, wait 24 hours before applying a third coat (Note: these containers required 3 coats each)

 

*When painting the votive, the paint pooled in the bottom of the votive because it was difficult to apply to the sides without it also coating the bottom. Another reason it may be easier to just coat the exterior next time, although I like how the votive turned out!

 

 

Allow to dry fully before handling

Allow to dry fully before handling

 3. Allow to Dry Fully:

Allow paint to dry at room temperature for 24 hours

 

 

 

 

 

Of all the methods used, spray paint is by far the easiest, and looks great. I am amazed by the variety of spray paints available, in matte, glossy and metallic finishes. Seriously, the possibilities are endless! Spray paint IS more expensive, and can’t be done on your kitchen counter, so I had to wait for a nice day to paint (NOT easy this spring in the Minnesota – it has been raining endlessly). Spray paint can be used for other projects and I plan to use the rest of the satin nickel paint for something else.

I will post pictures of the finished dining room and the three types of accent pieces together soon. Things are coming together!